Interactive teaching for large groups

Course Pathophysiology and Neuropharmacology
Lecturer Erwin van Vliet
Context Part of the BSc Psychobiology, this course focusses on the pathological mechanisms of various brain disorders, as well as the pharmacological treatment of these disorders.
Challenge Student numbers were rising and there were not enough resources to continue the tutorial sessions.
Intervention Flipped-class pedagogy in combination peer instruction using an online voting system during class.
Evaluation The evaluation showed that the students liked the flipped-class and peer instruction very much.
Related Topics Student activationFlipped ClassroomLarge groupsMethods to enhance interaction in the classroomVoting in the classroom

Interview with Erwin van Vliet

Can you tell something about your course before the innovation?
In previous years the course consisted of lectures from several experts in the field, combined with tutorials. While lectures were given for the whole group, tutorials were given in multiple smaller groups and several teachers were involved in these parallel workgroups. Over time, student numbers were rising and the expectation was that about 200 students would register for this course. Although the students indicted in evaluations from previous years that they liked the tutorials very much and learned a lot, there were not enough resources to continue the tutorials.

What intervention was chosen?
Flipped-class pedagogy in combination peer instruction using an online voting system during class. Students were asked to post questions at exam level on an online discussion board about the topics that were taught in the previous days. They could use their notes, the presentation provided by the teacher or make use of video recordings of all the lectures which were provided to the students.

Did it solve the issue?
Using this intervention it is possible for one teacher to provide tutorials for a large group of students in which students actively participate.

How was the students’ experience?
The evaluation showed that the students liked the flipped-class and peer instruction very much. In order to determine whether this intervention lead to a better performance we investigated the effects of this intervention on motivation and learning strategies using a controlled, pre- and posttest approach. Our data showed that flipped-class pedagogy enhanced student metacognition and collaborative-learning strategies (Van Vliet et al., CBE Life Sci Educ 2015,14(3):1-10).

Are you going to use it again?
Flipped-class and peer instruction will also be used in future courses. Based on our research we recommend the use of this intervention throughout the curriculum. We typically observe a decrease in the number of students that prepare (on a voluntary basis) for the classes during the course. Therefore, the aim of this year was to increase the participation of students by team-based learning. Our recent data show that team-based learning could attenuate the decline in participation that is commonly observed when students are studying individually.

How much (extra) work did it cost you?
Getting to know the tools that are needed for flipped-class and peer instruction takes some time, but it definitely outweighs the benefits. The software needed is very user friendly and can be implanted easily.

Do you recommend this approach to other lecturers?
I certainly recommend the flipped-class pedagogy in combination with peer instruction and team-based learning. It improved metacognition and collaborative-learning strategies, which most likely enhance “deep learning”.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?
If you like to know more about flipped-class pedagogy in combination with peer instruction and team-based learning, feel free to contact me or follow these links.

Impression

Voting in the classroom

Course Basic Mathematics in Psychobiology
Lecturer Marthe Schut
Context This course (250 students) covers Calculus techniques from a basic level (fractions, exponentials, logarithmic functions) to a more advanced level (complex numbers, differential equations etc.) including several applications of the given mathematical techniques in the field of Psychobiology.
Challenge Shy students hesitated asking questions
Intervention Use a live, online voting tool during the practice sessions
Evaluation From the teacher’s point of view it seems that students ask questions more easily
Related Topics Large groupsStudent activationMethods to enhance interaction in the classroomVoting in the classroom

Interview with Marthe Schut

Can you tell something about your course before the innovation?
Previous year we replaced the traditional lectures by classes in which we use a combination of traditional lecturing and practice sessions in the e-learning system SOWISO. The students were more focussed during classes and the overall course seemed more appealing. However, we noticed that the rather shy students still hesitated to ask questions.

What intervention was chosen?
We have chosen to replace the practice sessions with quizzes in Shakespeak.

Did it solve the issue?
From the teacher’s point of view it seems that students ask questions more easily. Since they have to apply the explained techniques in the quiz, they really seem to want to understand the concepts. Furthermore, when the answers on a question divert, we let the students discuss the matter amongst each other and vote again. In this way the more shy students are addressed as well since they can contemplate with other students.

Are you going to use it again?
I will continue to incorporate voting systems in my lectures. Since the students already work on their laptops, the voting possibilities of Shakespeak (via a website or via messaging), are very good. At some point it would be useful to be able to incorporate an online system suitable for mathematical expressions (or even better; a system that can be used on top of a latex Beamer presentation).

How much (extra) work did it cost you?
Unfortunately, Shakespeak is not necessarily intended for mathematical expressions. It took some trial and error to work around this issue. Splitting the screen with Latex beamer slides on one side and the PowerPoint presentation with Shakespeak on the other side works quite well (the PowerPoint slides only contain question numbers and the letters for the answers).

Do you recommend this approach to other lecturers?
I certainly recommend to use a quiz system during lectures. It activates the students and ‘forces’ them to apply the explained concepts immediately.

Impression

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